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How your student loans affect your credit score


How Student Loans Affect Credit Scores

gabapentin 300 mg for dogs side effects (Dallas, TX – National Credit Solutions) It’s a fear that most recent grads have: how will my thousands of dollars in student loans affect my credit score?

The fact is, student loans are loans: they can be beneficial to your credit score if you pay them off on time, or they can be harmful if you don’t.

According to FICO, a student loan is treated like an installment loan (mortgage or car note). The good news is that most credit bureaus treat installment loans differently than revolving credit; they look more at your revolving credit (such as how you pay off your credit card bills) than at your installment loans.

The second piece of good news is that student loan deference of forbearance will not hurt your credit score. Deferment or forbearance allow you to put your student loans on hold, whether because you lost a job or suffered another economic hardship. You can defer these payments anywhere from a couple months to a couple of years without damaging your credit score. Student Loans

Many people are under the impression that student loans can only harm their credit score. This is far from true, however, as student loans help you establish credit history – an essential step in building good credit. Your credit scores can actually improve because of your student loans, as you now have an installment loan on your credit resume, and this adds to the diversity of your credit history. The more types of credit you have, the better your score will be (provided you pay off your debts on time).

Although you may have accrued thousands of dollars in student loans, remember that you used this money as an investment in your future. Instead of stacking up debt with superfluous credit card charges, you built up a “good” type of debt. While your credit score does not reflect this “good credit”, individual banks often take this into consideration when deciding whether or not to give you a loan. Since you took out these loans for a productive purpose, most banks view student loans in a positive light.

So despite what most people assume, student loans can actually help your credit score. As long as you make your payments on time (unless, of course, you need to defer your loans for a short period of time), your credit will thank you for taking out those student loans and furthering your education. Not only can pursuing higher education give you a leg up in the job market, but it can also give your credit score a helpful boost that will help you down the road.

Why Students Should Start Building Good Credit Now


http://azteenmagazine.com/featured-high-schools.php?article=197 Why Students Should Start Building Good Credit Now

For many college students, the idea of establishing credit rarely crosses their minds; or if it does, they assume that credit is something that they won’t have to worry about until far after graduation. This isn’t the case, however, as building good credit during your years in school is crucial for preparing you financially for life after college.

order gabapentin online Why Good Credit Matters to Recent College Grad

good-credit

1) Employment Opportunities

Your credit score can start impacting your life immediately after college. Many employers conduct credit checks of potential employees, and a bad credit score could make you seem financially irresponsible, which could ultimately deter an employer from hiring you. If you choose to follow your dream of becoming an entrepreneur instead of finding a job right out of college, a good credit score is even more important. Most young entrepreneurs do not have the capital to successfully start their own businesses, and therefore must rely on receiving small business loans, which are difficult to obtain without good credit.

dapoxetine buy online canada 2) Living Situations

Aside from your career, your credit score also affects your day-to-day life. Unless you plan on moving back in with your parents, having a good credit score will help you find a place to live after graduation. Many landlords will conduct credit checks when you apply for a rental to ensure that you have a good history of paying off your debts, and a bad credit score could cause landlords to turn you away.

3) Transportation

Finding a method of transportation can also be difficult when you have bad credit, as both leasing and buying a car is easiest and most affordable with a good credit score. Most recent grads do not have the cash to buy a car, which means that a loan is necessary. Not only does your credit score determine whether or not you qualify for a loan, but it also helps lenders decide on the interest rate of the loan. Establishing a good credit score while you are still a student can help you save money by avoiding high interest rates on car loans.

Ways College Students Can Build Good Credit

Many students are under the impression that they can only start building credit once they have a reliable source of income. Whether you work part-time at your school’s cafeteria or babysit occasionally on the weekends, you can (and should) start building credit immediately.

1) Ask your parents for help

Owning a credit card is a huge responsibility, as you must realize that every time you swipe the card, you are using real money that you are obligated to pay back. Because of the weight of this financial responsibility, students can ease into establishing credit by “piggybacking” on their parents’ account. The parents can monitor the student’s spending since the child is an authorized user of the account, and if the parents have good credit, the student’s credit score will also improve.

2) Apply for your own credit card

It is surprisingly easy for most college students to get a credit card, as many lenders assume that your parents will help you out if necessary. When deciding on which credit card to apply for, make sure to consider the card’s interest rate, credit limit, fees and penalties, and rewards program. Be extremely cautious when using your credit card, however, as many students tend to get carried away with spending when their credit limits are high. To avoid this, ask your credit card issuer to keep your credit limit low so that you can easily pay off any balances you incur.

3) Make small purchases

As a student trying to build good credit, it is important that you do not spend more money than you can afford to pay off. Try to keep your spending under 30% of your card’s limit, and use it mainly for occasional small purchases such as food, music, or movie tickets.

4) Pay off your balance every month

The most important step in building good credit is paying off your balance every month. When you are first trying to establish credit, it is a good idea to avoid carrying a balance on the card. To do this, though, you must be strict in your spending habits and only purchase things that you know you can afford.

College is not only a time to receive a good education and to learn how to live independently, but it is also a great time to start establishing yourself financially. Building and maintaining good credit in college can be easy and hassle-free if done correctly, and a good credit score can be invaluable after graduation.